Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

Japanese Cocktail

3/4 large bar glass ice

Ingredient: ice

What it is:  Additive
The new general availability of ice in the mid 1800s revolutionized bar-tending and drinking. Ice was delivered in blocks that then had to to be broken, crushed, picked and shaved for increasingly popular individual drinks (as opposed to large punches).

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shaved
2 to 3 dash orgeat syrup

Ingredient: orgeat syrup

Also Known As:  orgeade What it is:  Syrup
Sweet syrup made from almonds, sugar and rose water or orange-flower water. It was, however, originally made with a barley-almond blend. It has a pronounced almond taste and is used to flavor many cocktails, perhaps the most famous of which is the Mai Tai.

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2 to 3 dash Boker's bitters

Ingredient: Boker's bitters

What it is:  Bitters
Brand of proprietary, aromatic bitters no longer available. Appears mostly in 19th century cocktail books. Other barnds such as Angostura or Fee Brothers can be used as substitutes.

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2 dash maraschino

Ingredient: maraschino

What it is:  Liqueur
Bittersweet, clear liqueur flavored with Marasca cherries, which are grown in Dalmatia, Croatia, mostly around the city of Zadar and in Torreglia (near Padua in Northern Italy).

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1 wine-glass brandy

Ingredient: brandy

What it is:  Brandy
Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine, the wine having first been produced by fermenting grapes. Brandy generally contains 35%–60% alcohol by volume and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. While some brandies are aged in wooden casks, most are colored with caramel coloring to imitate the effect of such aging.

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(Use a large bar glass.)

Mix well with a spoon and strain it into a fancy cocktail glass, twist a piece of lemon peel on top, and serve. (Note: Recipe called for "Eau Celeste (Himmels Wasser)" instead of brandy--but since eau celeste (heaven's water) is a solution of cupric ammonium sulfate used as a fungicide, something's not right! Because brandy appears in other recipes, we offer it as a substitute.)