Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

Italian Style of Mixing Absinithe

1 pony glass absinthe

Ingredient: absinthe

What it is:  Spirit
An anise-flavored spirit derived from herbs, including the flowers and leaves of the herb Artemisia absinthium (wormwood). Absinthe traditionally has a natural green color but can also be colorless. Although absinthe was vilified, no evidence has shown it to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits.

(More about absinthe)

2 to 3 lump ice

Ingredient: ice

What it is:  Additive
The new general availability of ice in the mid 1800s revolutionized bar-tending and drinking. Ice was delivered in blocks that then had to to be broken, crushed, picked and shaved for increasingly popular individual drinks (as opposed to large punches).

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broken
2 to 3 dash maraschino

Ingredient: maraschino

What it is:  Liqueur
Bittersweet, clear liqueur flavored with Marasca cherries, which are grown in Dalmatia, Croatia, mostly around the city of Zadar and in Torreglia (near Padua in Northern Italy).

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1/2 pony glass anisette

Ingredient: anisette

Also Known As:  anis, liqueur d'anis What it is:  Liqueur
Anise-flavored liqueur that is sweeter than most anise-flavored liqueurs (such as pastis), and also has a lower alcohol content (typically 25% by volume, versus 40%). Like pastis, it was first created to replace absinthe. Marie Brizard is a well-known producer of French-style anisette. Anís del Mono is a Spanish brand. Sambucca Romana is one of Italy's versions.

(More about anisette)

(Use a large bar glass.)

Take a small pitcher of ice water, and pour the water slowly into a large bar glass containing the mixture, stir with a spoon and serve. This is a very pleasant way of drinking Absinthe. As it promotes appetite, it is especially recommended before meals.