Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

Tom and Jerry

5 pound sugar

Ingredient: sugar

What it is:  Additive
Many 19th century recipes specifically called for white sugar, which is more refined and preferred over browner sugars. But modern white sugar is probably too refined, making raw cane sugar the best, easily available choice.

(More about sugar)

12 egg

Ingredient: egg

What it is:  Additive
Bird eggs are a common food and one of the most versatile ingredients used in cooking and have long been used in drinks. Usually used to add consistency and foam, egg whites and yolks are usually separated with "silver" indicating the white and "golden" the yolk. Modern chicken eggs are much larger, so use the smallest ones available.

(More about egg)

1/2 small bar glass Jamaica rum

Ingredient: Jamaica rum

What it is:  Rum
Generic term for dark rum from Jamaica. Dark rum differs from gold in that some residual molasses is retained in the final product, in order to slightly sweeten the flavor. Very popular in the late 1800s and superior to most New England rums. Modern approximations include Inner Circle, Gosling's Black Seal and Pusser's Navy Rum.

(More about Jamaica rum)

1 1/2 tea-spoon cinnamon

Ingredient: cinnamon

What it is:  Spice
Spice from the bark of the small evergreen tree belonging to the family Lauraceae, native to Sri Lanka.

(More about cinnamon)

ground
1/2 tea-spoon clove

Ingredient: clove

What it is:  Spice
Aromatic dried flower buds of a tree in the family Myrtaceae. Cloves are native to Indonesia and India and used as a spice in cuisine all over the world.

(More about clove)

ground
1/2 tea-spoon allspice

Ingredient: allspice

Also Known As:  Jamaica pepper What it is:  Spice

A spice which is the dried unripe fruit ("berries") of Pimenta dioica. The name "allspice" was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves.

(More about allspice)

ground
(Use punch-bowl for the mixture.)

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, and the yolks until they are as thin as water, then mix together and add the spice and rum, thicken with sugar until the mixture attains the consistence of a light batter.

To deal out Tom and Jerry to customers:

Take a small bar glass, and to one table-spoonful of the above mixture, add one wine-glass of brandy, and fill the glass with boiling water, grate a little nutmeg on top.

Adepts at the bar, in serving Tom and Jerry, sometimes adopt a mixture of 1/2 brandy, 1/4 Jamaica rum, and 1/4 Santa Cruz rum, instead of brandy plain. This compound is usually mixed and kept in a bottle, and a wine-glassful & used to each tumbler of Tom and Jerry.

N. B.—A tea-spoonful of cream of tartar, or about as much carbonate of soda as you can get on a dime, will prevent the sugar from settling to the bottom of the mixture.

This drink is sometimes called Copenhagen, and sometimes Jerry Thomas.