Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

White Tiger's Milk

(From recipe in the possession of Thomas Dunn English, Esq.)
1/2 fifth applejack

Ingredient: applejack

What it is:  Brandy
Applejack originates from the American colonial period, and is probably derived from the French apple brandy Calvados. Applejack is made by concentrating hard cider, either by the traditional method of freeze distillation or by true evaporative distillation. The term "applejack" derives from "jacking", a term for freeze distillation.

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1/2 fifth peach brandy

Ingredient: peach brandy

What it is:  Brandy
Fruit brandy made from peaches. Fruit brandy usually contains 40% to 45% ABV. It is usually colorless and is customarily drunk chilled or over ice.

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1/2 tea-spoon aromatic tincture

Ingredient: aromatic tincture

What it is:  Additive
From Prof Jerry Thomas: Take of ginger, cinnamon, orange peel, each one ounce; valerian half an ounce, alcohol two quarts, macerate in a close vessel for fourteen days, then filter through unsized paper.

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sugar

Ingredient: sugar

What it is:  Additive
Many 19th century recipes specifically called for white sugar, which is more refined and preferred over browner sugars. But modern white sugar is probably too refined, making raw cane sugar the best, easily available choice.

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to taste
1 egg

Ingredient: egg

What it is:  Additive
Bird eggs are a common food and one of the most versatile ingredients used in cooking and have long been used in drinks. Usually used to add consistency and foam, egg whites and yolks are usually separated with "silver" indicating the white and "golden" the yolk. Modern chicken eggs are much larger, so use the smallest ones available.

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1 quart milk

Ingredient: milk

What it is:  Additive
Opaque white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals.

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Pour in the mixed liquors to the milk, stirring all the white till all is well mixed, then sprinkle with nutmeg.

The above recipe is sufficient to make a full quart of "white tiger's milk;" if more is wanted, you can increase the above proportions. If you want to prepare this beverage for a party of twenty, use one gallon of milk to one pint of apple-jack, &c.

*Aromatic Tincture.—Take of ginger, cinnamon, orange peel, each one ounce; valerian half an ounce, aleohol two quarts, macerate in a close vessel for fourteen days, then filter through unsized paper.