Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

Tip-Top Punch

3 to 4 lump ice

Ingredient: ice

What it is:  Additive
The new general availability of ice in the mid 1800s revolutionized bar-tending and drinking. Ice was delivered in blocks that then had to to be broken, crushed, picked and shaved for increasingly popular individual drinks (as opposed to large punches).

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broken
1 pony glass brandy

Ingredient: brandy

What it is:  Brandy
Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine, the wine having first been produced by fermenting grapes. Brandy generally contains 35%–60% alcohol by volume and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. While some brandies are aged in wooden casks, most are colored with caramel coloring to imitate the effect of such aging.

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1 piece loaf sugar

Ingredient: loaf sugar

Also Known As:  sugarloaf What it is:  Additive
Traditional form in which refined sugar was produced and sold until the late 19th century when granulated and cube sugars were introduced. A tall cone with a rounded top, it was the end product of a process that saw the dark molasses-rich raw sugar, which had been imported from sugar cane growing regions such as the Caribbean and Brazil, refined into white sugar. Raw cane sugar the best, easily available substitute.

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1 to 2 slice orange

Ingredient: orange

What it is:  Fruit
Fruit of Citrus sinensis is called sweet orange to distinguish it from Citrus aurantium, the bitter orange.

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1 to 2 slice pineapple

Ingredient: pineapple

What it is:  Fruit
Common name for an edible tropical plant and also its fruit. While sweet, it is known for its high acid content

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2 to 3 drop lemon

Ingredient: lemon

What it is:  Fruit
Common name for Citrus limon.

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juice
1 large bar glass Champagne

Ingredient: Champagne

Also Known As:  Sparkling wine What it is:  Wine
Sparkling wine produced by inducing the in-bottle secondary fermentation of the wine to effect carbonation. It is produced exclusively within the Champagne region of France.

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to fill up the balance
(Use a large bar glass.)

Fill up the balance with Champagne; mix well with a spoon, dress up the top with fruits in season, and serve with a straw.

This drink is only mixed where they have Champagne on draught, as mentioned in other receipts.