Classic Mixology: Cocktail & Mixed Drink Recipes

Uncle Toby Punch

2 lemon

Ingredient: lemon

What it is:  Fruit
Common name for Citrus limon.

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1/2 pound sugar

Ingredient: sugar

What it is:  Additive
Many 19th century recipes specifically called for white sugar, which is more refined and preferred over browner sugars. But modern white sugar is probably too refined, making raw cane sugar the best, easily available choice.

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3 quart water

Ingredient: water

What it is:  Additive
Ubiquitous chemical substance that is composed of hydrogen and oxygen and is essential for all forms of life -- also a component of all drinks.

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boiling
1/2 quart brandy

Ingredient: brandy

What it is:  Brandy
Brandy (from brandywine, derived from Dutch brandewijn—"burnt wine") is a spirit produced by distilling wine, the wine having first been produced by fermenting grapes. Brandy generally contains 35%–60% alcohol by volume and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. While some brandies are aged in wooden casks, most are colored with caramel coloring to imitate the effect of such aging.

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1/2 quart rum

Ingredient: rum

What it is:  Rum
Distilled beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses and sugarcane juice and then usually aged in oak and other barrels. The majority of the world's rum production occurs in and around the Caribbean and in several South American countries, such as Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana and Brazil. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas golden and dark rums are also appropriate for drinking straight, or for cooking.

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(English.)

Take two large fresh lemons with rough skins, quite ripe, and some large lumps of double-refined sugar. Rub the sugar over the lemons till it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skins. Then put into the bowl these lumps, and as much more as the juice of the lemons may be supposed to require; for no certain weight can be mentioned, as the acidity of a lemon cannot be known till tried, and therefore this must be determined by the taste. Then squeeze the lemon juice upon the sugar; and, with a bruiser press the sugar and the juice particularly well together, for a great deal of the richness and fine flavor of the punch depends on this rubbing and mixing process being thoroughly performed. Then mix this up very well with boiling water (soft water is best) till the whole is rather cool. When this mixture (which is now called the sherbet) is to your taste, take brandy and rum in equal quantities, and put them to it, mixing the whole well together again. The quantity of liquor must be according to your taste; two good lemons are generally enough to make four quarts of punch, including a quart of liquor, with half a pound of sugar; but this depends much on taste, and on the strength of the spirit.

As the pulp is disagreeable to some persons, the sherbet may be strained before the liquor is put in. Some strain the lemon before they put it to the sugar, which is improper, as, when the pulp and sugar are well mixed together, it adds much to the richness of the punch.

When only rum is used, about half a pint of porter will soften the punch; and even when both rum and brandy are used, the porter gives a richness, and to some a very pleasant flavor.